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Fujisawa Rina gets Women’s Honinbo title at the youngest age

Congrats to 16 year young Fujisawa Rina winning the most prestigious title
– Rina becomes the youngest Women’s Honinbo title holder ever!

The title “[Honinbo][1]” is the oldest Go tournament in the world and in some ways still the most prestigious in Japan (first started in 1939)… and is decided by best of five match.

The winner’s prize is ¥5,800,000.


The finals: Mukai Chiaki (5PD) as the title holder [Player’s card @ Nihon-kiin][2] vs. Fujisawa Rina (2PD) [player’s card @ Nihon-Kiin][3]

23441774fb259363bd0caa3914957c4dbcdc375a9219 vs. 23454b7535b7588623ab0ccd5248610095f8ee3baa6f

Mukai Chiaki (向井千瑛, born December 24, 1987) is a Nihon Ki-in professional. She reached 1 dan in 2004, 2 dan in 2007, 3 dan in 2009, 4 dan in 2010, 5 dan from 2012-02-01 and is a disciple of Honda Sachiko. Her two sisters Mukai Kozue and Mukai Kaori are also professionals. (Source: [SL][4])

Fujisawa Rina (藤沢里菜) is a Japanese professional female go player, born 1998-09-18, who passed a pro exam in 2010 while in the fifth grade of elementary school. On April 1st 2010, she received her professional diploma at the age of 11 years and 6 months, making her the youngest person in Japan to become a professional. The previous record was held by Cho Chikun who became a professional when he was 11 years 9 months old. Fujisawa began learning Go at the age of 6 and studied under the tutelage of Hong Malk-eun Saem. She was promoted 2 dan in 2013-02-14 (30 wins as 1 dan). – Source: [SL][5]

23486d5878944d49a276ea4d2d827ac5d7b54bd27e7f 234901231bfcd436d6a7fd600bee40d36171b8f54577


Some snaps… (source: [The Nihon Ki-in (Japan Go Association)][6])

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The venue of the first game (Iwate prefecture)

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At the Reception party of the first game of the 33rd Women’s Honinbo!

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The first move of the first game was played by Rina

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The second move was played by Mukai (the title holder: Women’s Honinbo)

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Rina won the first game by resignation

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Commentary Room: Kataoka Satoshi 9p

The first game (7th Nov 2014) looks like Fujisawa Rina (as black) follows a strategy for a centre oriented playing, here the status of the game at move 103 (source: [GoKifu.com][7]).
2354494d1bf500cf2b8f83667d667fdba8f987ad7b80

1sts game: Fujisawa Rina (b) vs. Mukai Chiaki (w)… result: b+r
womens-honinbo-2014-first-game-07112014-1
2087-gokifu-20141107-Mukai_Chiaki-Fujisawa_Rina.sgf (1.5 KB)

For your individual review / Go training pick up the SGF here:  Eidogo | OGS


The second game was also won by Rina
235717fd4a9d22bd3a110254760fa658791f068583fd2356c285da470f2767d2e39ee8b32c355c37ae230ead

The third game was played at the Nihon Ki-in
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[1]: http://senseis.xmp.net/?Honinbo#toc2
[2]: http://www.nihonkiin.or.jp/player/htm/ki000399.htm
[3]: http://www.nihonkiin.or.jp/player/htm/ki000399.htm
[4]: http://senseis.xmp.net/?MukaiChiaki
[5]: http://senseis.xmp.net/?FujisawaRina
[6]: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Nihon-Ki-in-Japan-Go-Association/286261298096771
[7]: http://gokifu.com/s/2087-gokifu-20141107-Fujisawa_Rina%282p%29-Mukai_Chiaki%285p%29.html

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Thailand: 19th Asian University GO Tournament 2014 (14th-16th Nov)

9 higher competitions which will be held from 14 – 16 Nov 2014 at Mae Fah Luang University (in the province of Chiang Rai in Northern Thailand)…

u-go2014-01-poster


MFU Hosts the 19th Asian University Go Tournament 2014

university-logo-1On 14 to 16 November 2014, Mae Fah Luang University (MFU) by Student Development Division and Go Association of Thailand organized the 19th ASIAN University Go Tournament 2014 at the Police General Pao Sarasin Building (C5).

            On the opening ceremony 14 November 2014, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vanchai Sirichana, MFU President, welcomed all participants from 60 institutions and thanked the Go Association of Thailand for their encouragement and support. He is stating that “Go is a good game, a game of skill that challenges player’s analytical skills”.

            In this occasion, Mr. Korsak Chairasmisak, the Chairperson of the Go Association of Thailand (also serving as Vice Chairperson of CP All Public Co., Ltd.) reported that the Go game became a tertiary-education level competition in 1994, and has been played as an annual tournament since 1995. Currently, 23 universities in Thailand teach Go as an elective course for students. Thailand is home to approximately one million Go players (ranking 5th from 74 countries in the world). As Go has become so popular in Thailand, next year’s “World Go Tournament” will be held at the Montien Bangkok Hotel, and will be the first time that it will be hosted outside of China, Korea, or Japan, an indicator of Thailand’s success.

            Afterward, the Chairperson of the Ceremony,Phra Maha Wudhijaya Vajiramedhi, provided the audience and participants with background history, informing that the “Game has been developed in China more than 3,000 years ago, then spread to Korea and Japan, and now worldwide. Go is not only entertaining, but also helps the player practice strategy, planning, and decision making using logic and analytical skills while also helping players control their emotions. Go requires the practice of a combination of strategy and focus, and changes with each move. Phra Maha Wudhijaya Vajiramedhi compared Go-playing to real life, in which we must think about every move and action, accept the results of our actions, and plan our next moves accordingly, remembering that “One person cannot win everything, but they can learn from their antagonists”.

            Miss Tipanya Mothaniyachat, a fourth year student from the School of Cosmetic Science and a participating Go competitor, led the participants in giving their vows. Miss Tipanya Mothaniyachat said that Go helps her focus, pay attention, and plan her life with increased awareness. She has been playing Go since high school, and had enrolled in the Chinese-Go class available from the School of Liberal Arts while studying at MFU and had participated in many competitions. Recently, she had received first place for the team category in the “41st National Sporting Games (Chiang Mai Games)”.

            Mr. Kimura Kiyonari, a professional Go player from Waseda University, Japan also participated in the competition. He has been playing Go since he was 9 years old, and also said that Go has helped him think more carefully and have better focus in his education, work, and daily life.

1811572(Source: 11/2014 – Mae Fah Luang University Muang | Center for Information Technology Services – contact: inter@mfu.ac.th

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